Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Upgrading training for driver jobs

Sunday, June 9th, 2019

A new rule may affect training for driver jobs.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced a final rule streamlining the process and reducing costs to upgrade from a Class B to Class A Commercial Driver’s License (CDL).

By adopting a new Class A CDL theory instruction upgrade curriculum, the final rule will save eligible driver trainees and motor carriers $18 million annually.

“Today’s action demonstrates the Department’s commitment to reducing regulatory burdens and addressing our nation’s shortage of commercial drivers,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

FMCSA is amending the Entry-Level Driver Training (ELDT) regulations published on December 8, 2016.  The ELDT rule requires the same level of theory training for individuals obtaining a CDL for the first time as for those who already hold a Class B CDL and are upgrading to a Class A CDL.  FMCSA recognizes that because Class B CDL holders have prior training or experience, they should not be required to receive the same level of theory training as individuals who have never held a CDL.  FMCSA has concluded this change will maintain the same level of safety established by the 2016 ELDT rule.

“This effort is a common-sense way of reducing the regulatory burdens placed on CDL applicants and their employers.  FMCSA continues to strategically reform burdensome regulations to improve the lives of ordinary Americans by saving them valuable time and money – while simultaneously maintaining the highest level of safety,” said FMCSA Administrator Raymond P. Martinez.

FMCSA estimates that over 11,000 driver-trainees will benefit annually by this rule and see an average reduction of 27 hours in time spent completing their theory instruction.  This results in substantial time and cost savings to these driver-trainees, as well as to the motor carriers that employ these drivers.

Input for driver jobs

Sunday, June 9th, 2019

Input is being sought on one aspect of driver jobs.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issued advance notices of proposed rulemaking on the removal of unnecessary regulatory barriers to the safe introduction of automated driving systems (ADS) vehicles in the United States.

NHTSA and FMCSA are seeking comments at this stage to ensure that all potential approaches are fully considered as the agencies move forward with these regulatory actions.

“One of the Department’s priorities is to prepare for the future by engaging with new technology while addressing legitimate public concerns about safety, security, and privacy, without hampering innovation,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

NHTSA seeks comment (http://www.nhtsa.gov/links/ads_barriers_anprm-05222019.pdf) on identifying and addressing regulatory barriers to the deployment of ADS vehicles posed by certain existing Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS).  The agency is also interested in hearing from the public on various approaches that could be used to measure compliance with the FMVSS for vehicles without conventional controls, including steering wheels and brake pedals.  Public comments received during this stage will help inform NHTSA’s path forward.

The ANPRM (https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/newsroom/safe-integration-automated-driving-systems-equipped-commercial-motor-vehicles) released by FMCSA seeks public comment on questions regarding several key regulatory areas to better understand how changes to its rules can account for significant differences between human operators and ADS.

These questions focus on topics such as: requirements of human drivers; CDL endorsements; Hours of Service rules; medical qualifications; distracted driving; safe driving, inspection, repair, and maintenance; roadside inspections; and cybersecurity.

“Our mission is to protect Americans on our roads,” said NHTSA Deputy Administrator Heidi King.  “As automated driving systems develop, NHTSA will continue to adapt to make sure the agency is equipped to ensure public safety while encouraging innovation.”

Mandate to affect driver jobs

Monday, May 27th, 2019

A new mandate may affect different driver jobs.

The California Air Resources Board voted to mandate that all transit agencies in California operate 100 percent zero emission transit buses by 2040, and to use this transition to invest in workforce development training programs in manufacturing, infrastructure installation, and maintenance.

The rule, which includes language calling for good jobs and resolving to develop further workforce policies, was passed after years of advocacy from a broad coalition of labor, environmental and economic justice organizations including the United Steelworkers, Sierra Club, Earthjustice, Union of Concerned Scientists, American Lung Association, BlueGreen Alliance, Coalition for Clean Air, Jobs to Move America, CWA District 9, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 11, IBEW Local 569, and IBEW LMCC.

According to research from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, if all of the buses purchased under this mandate were built in the U.S., this mandate could support up to 41,380 U.S. jobs.

With policies such as the U.S. Employment Plan, California transit agencies will be able to incentivize bus companies to hire local workers as they transition to zero emission fleets. Such policies can also ensure historically excluded populations, including women and communities of color, have access to these jobs.

“The passing of this rule is a huge win for many in our communities who, despite working hard for years, have been unable to benefit from the Silicon Valley tech boom and infrastructure investment. Not only will this rule reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but it also has the potential to create and support tens of thousands of jobs in our state,” said Abhilasha Bhola, Senior Policy Coordinator at Jobs to Move America.

Rules regarding driver jobs

Tuesday, May 7th, 2019

Some new rules have been enacted regarding driver jobs.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) recently announced it is granting petitions to preempt the State of California’s meal and rest break rules, which differ from current Federal hours-of-service regulations.

FMCSA’s granting of these petitions is in response to widespread concern from drivers, concerned citizens, and industry stakeholders.  In 1996, Congress preempted states from enacting or enforcing policies “related to a price, route, or service of any motor carrier.”

California’s law is incompatible with Federal regulations and causes a disruption in interstate commerce.

In addition, the confusing and conflicting requirements are overly burdensome for drivers and reduce productivity, increasing costs for consumers.

Additionally, safety issues have likely resulted from the lack of adequate parking solutions for trucks in the State.

“Safety is FMCSA’s top priority and having uniform rules is a key component to increasing safety for our truck drivers,” said FMCSA Administrator Raymond P. Martinez.  “During the public comment period, FMCSA heard directly from drivers, small business owners, and industry stakeholders that California’s meal and rest rules not only pose a safety risk, but also lead to a loss in productivity and ultimately hurt American consumers.”

In all, over 700 public comments were submitted to the Federal Register docket regarding the petitions.

Regulations and driver jobs

Tuesday, May 7th, 2019

An upgrade in regulations will affect driver jobs.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced a final rule streamlining the process and reducing costs to upgrade from a Class B to Class A Commercial Driver’s License (CDL).  By adopting a new Class A CDL theory instruction upgrade curriculum, the final rule will save eligible driver trainees and motor carriers $18 million annually.

“Today’s action demonstrates the Department’s commitment to reducing regulatory burdens and addressing our nation’s shortage of commercial drivers,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

FMCSA is amending the Entry-Level Driver Training (ELDT) regulations published on December 8, 2016.  The ELDT rule requires the same level of theory training for individuals obtaining a CDL for the first time as for those who already hold a Class B CDL and are upgrading to a Class A CDL.  FMCSA recognizes that because Class B CDL holders have prior training or experience, they should not be required to receive the same level of theory training as individuals who have never held a CDL.  FMCSA has concluded this change will maintain the same level of safety established by the 2016 ELDT rule.

“This effort is a common-sense way of reducing the regulatory burdens placed on CDL applicants and their employers.  FMCSA continues to strategically reform burdensome regulations to improve the lives of ordinary Americans by saving them valuable time and money – while simultaneously maintaining the highest level of safety,” said FMCSA Administrator Raymond P. Martinez.

FMCSA estimates that over 11,000 driver-trainees will benefit annually by this rule and see an average reduction of 27 hours in time spent completing their theory instruction.  This results in substantial time and cost savings to these driver-trainees, as well as to the motor carriers that employ these drivers.

The final rule applies only to Class B CDL holders, and does not change the behind-the-wheel (BTW) (range and public road) training requirements set forth in the 2016 ELDT rule.  All driver-trainees, including those who hold a Class B CDL, must demonstrate proficiency in all elements of the BTW curriculum in a Group A vehicle.

Workshop for driver jobs and safety

Sunday, April 28th, 2019

A new workshop regarding driver jobs and its safety is being planned.

The Connecticut Department of Labor’s Division of Occupational Safety and Health (CONN-OSHA) will offer a May 1 workshop regarding the safe operation of powered industrial trucks and the formal instruction, practical training, and evaluation of operator performance required by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

The morning workshop will be held 10 a.m. to noon at the Labor Department’s Wethersfield office located at 200 Folly Brook Boulevard.

“There are always hazards associated with operating any type of equipment,” explains CONN-OSHA Occupational Safety Training Specialist Catherine Zinsser. “Our goal is to make sure operators of these ‘fork trucks’ have the latest information and understand the requirements, since it can make a significant difference regarding their health and safety when operating this type of vehicle.”

Admission to the seminar is free, but pre-registration for the seminar is required.

 

Company increases pay for driver jobs

Sunday, April 7th, 2019

Walmart has decided to pay drivers more for driver jobs, according to CDLLife.com.

Though Walmart already offers some of the highest pay in the trucking industry, the company says that they’ll be offering a straightforward per mile pay increase to try to meet their goal of hiring nearly 1000 new drivers this year.

On January 23, Walmart announced that starting in February, they’ll be increasing driver pay by one cent per mile to a total of nearly 89 cents per mile.

The company says that this per-mile increase coupled with an extra $1 for every arrival means that the average pay for first year drivers will increase from $86,000 to $87,500.

This pay increase along with 21 days of paid vacation and the guarantee of a stable work schedule sets a new industry standard for how trucking companies can attract and retain drivers.

Walmart has plans to use the pay increase to attract 900 new drivers into their private fleet in 2019.

In addition to increasing driver pay, Walmart is also modifying how it hires drivers.

The company has shifted from a more stringent single day hiring process to a days-long hiring event during which new drivers work with veteran Walmart truckers to hone their skills and perfect their processes, the company has been able to significantly increase the number of drivers who qualify to join the team.

 

Regulatory costs and driver jobs

Sunday, April 7th, 2019

A new initiative is meant to streamline costs when it comes to obtaining driver jobs.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced a final rule streamlining the process and reducing costs to upgrade from a Class B to Class A Commercial Driver’s License (CDL).  By adopting a new Class A CDL theory instruction upgrade curriculum, the final rule will save eligible driver trainees and motor carriers $18 million annually.

“Today’s action demonstrates the Department’s commitment to reducing regulatory burdens and addressing our nation’s shortage of commercial drivers,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

FMCSA is amending the Entry-Level Driver Training (ELDT) regulations published on December 8, 2016.  The ELDT rule requires the same level of theory training for individuals obtaining a CDL for the first time as for those who already hold a Class B CDL and are upgrading to a Class A CDL.  FMCSA recognizes that because Class B CDL holders have prior training or experience, they should not be required to receive the same level of theory training as individuals who have never held a CDL.  FMCSA has concluded this change will maintain the same level of safety established by the 2016 ELDT rule.

“This effort is a common-sense way of reducing the regulatory burdens placed on CDL applicants and their employers.  FMCSA continues to strategically reform burdensome regulations to improve the lives of ordinary Americans by saving them valuable time and money – while simultaneously maintaining the highest level of safety,” said FMCSA Administrator Raymond P. Martinez.

FMCSA estimates that over 11,000 driver-trainees will benefit annually by this rule and see an average reduction of 27 hours in time spent completing their theory instruction.  This results in substantial time and cost savings to these driver-trainees, as well as to the motor carriers that employ these drivers.

Clearinghouse website for driver jobs

Sunday, April 7th, 2019

Additional online resources are being created for driver jobs.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) released additional online resources for Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) holders, employers, state driver licensing agencies, medical review officers, and substance abuse professionals regarding the upcoming implementation of its CDL Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse in January 2020.

The new clearinghouse resource webpage provides commercial motor vehicle (CMV) stakeholders with a variety of informative resources about the clearinghouse, including a comprehensive fact sheet, implementation timeline, frequently asked questions, and more.

Additionally, CMV stakeholders can sign-up to receive clearinghouse-related email updates as the implementation progresses.

“As this Congressional mandate is enacted, FMCSA’s goal is to provide as many resources and updates as possible to those who will be using the upcoming Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse.  As we transition to the use of the clearinghouse, we will ensure drivers, employers, and state licensing agencies are kept up-to-date throughout the implementation process.  FMCSA is here to be helpful and to assist all CMV stakeholders who have questions regarding the Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse,” said FMCSA Administrator Raymond P. Martinez.

The clearinghouse will be a secure online database that will allow FMCSA, CMV employers, State Driver Licensing Agencies, and law enforcement officials to identify – in real-time – CDL drivers who have violated federal drug and alcohol testing program requirements, and thereby improve safety on our nation’s roads.

 

Proposal would fund investments for driver jobs

Monday, March 11th, 2019

A new proposal would potentially fund infrastructure investments to help driver jobs.

American Trucking Associations President and CEO Chris Spear told the House Ways and Means Committee that the nation’s infrastructure needs demand real funding solutions from the federal government, not reliance on gimmickry.

“We are no longer facing a future highway maintenance crisis – we’re living it – and every day we fail to invest, we’re putting more lives at risk. In nearly 53 percent of the highway fatalities, the condition of the roadway contributed,” he said. “Time wasted sitting in traffic – rather than at work or with our families – has skyrocketed. Motorists now pay an average of $1,600 due to repairs and congestion each year. Trucking now loses $74.5 billion sitting in gridlock. These are regressive realities and the escalating costs of doing nothing – and they are reflected in the prices we all pay. These costs are measurable and should serve as offsets for new spending on our nation’s infrastructure.”

ATA has proposed a 20-cent-per-gallon fee on motor fuels – collected at the wholesale rack – as a way of raising real funding for investment in infrastructure. This fee, called the Build America Fund, would be phased in over four years at a nickel per year and generate $340 billion over the next decade for road and bridge repair and replacement.

“Federal inaction has prompted cash-strapped states to adopt regressive revenue schemes that hurt commuters, communities and divert funds to non-infrastructure priorities,” Spear said in his testimony, citing variable tolls on Interstate 66 in Virginia.

“This is the essence of regressive and our future if you choose to devolve your Constitutional authority to the states,” he said. “In contrast, if motorists paid the average toll – the cost of a 10-mile trip over an eight-day period on I-66 would equal their cost for an entire year under ATA’s Build America Fund for all roads and bridges in the United States.”