Archive for October, 2018

UPS hiring for driver jobs

Tuesday, October 9th, 2018

UPS is ramping up to hire for driver jobs.

The company said it expects to hire about 100,000 seasonal employees to support the anticipated increase in package volume that will begin in November and continue through January 2019.

“Every year, we deliver the holidays for millions of customers,” said Jim Barber, chief operating officer.  “In order to make that happen, we also deliver thousands of great seasonal jobs at our facilities across the country.”

The full- and part-time seasonal positions – primarily package handlers, drivers and driver-helpers – have long been an entry point for permanent employment at UPS. Many senior UPS executives, including Chief Executive Officer David Abney and other members of the company’s senior leadership team, started their UPS careers as part-time employees.

Over the last three years, 35 percent of the people UPS hired for seasonal package handler jobs were later hired in a permanent position when the holidays were over.

Randy Ervin of Newton, Iowa was a college student looking for a way to earn extra cash when he took a seasonal job as a UPS driver helper in October 1988. On Jan. 31 he’ll retire as a Labor Relations Manager with 30 years of service with the company. “I came to UPS with a motorcycle and a 2-year-old daughter,” Ervin said. “Thirty years later, I’m able to retire with financial security. It’s been a great career. UPS is probably one of the last Fortune 50 companies where you can come in and write your own future.”

Kevin Whitehill of Des Moines, Iowa was a college student when he started a seasonal job as a part-time package handler on his 19th birthday – Nov. 19, 1996. He worked part-time for several years and took advantage of UPS’s tuition reimbursement program to get his degree. Twenty-two years later, he’s an on-road supervisor managing tractor-trailer drivers. “I never intended UPS to be a career,” he said. “I took a job for Christmas. As I moved along, the opportunities were just too good to pass up.”

Process to affect driver jobs

Sunday, October 7th, 2018

A new process regarding diabetes will affect driver jobs.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced a final rule revising federal regulations permitting individuals with a stable insulin regimen and properly controlled insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) to be qualified to operate commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce.

Previously, individuals with ITDM were prohibited from driving CMVs in interstate commerce unless they obtained an exemption from FMCSA.  The action removes major administrative and financial burdens for this population of CMV operators while maintaining a high level of safety.

The rule enables a certified medical examiner (ME) to grant an individual with ITDM a Medical Examiner’s Certificate, MCSA-5876, for up to 12 months.  To do so, the treating clinician – the healthcare professional who manages, and prescribes insulin for, the treatment of the individual’s diabetes – provides the ITDM Assessment Form, MCSA-5870, to the certified ME indicating that the individual maintains a stable insulin regimen and proper control of his or her diabetes.  The certified ME is then responsible for determining if the individual meets FMCSA’s physical qualification standards and can operate CMVs in interstate commerce.

“This final action delivers economic savings to affected drivers and our agency, and streamlines processes by eliminating unnecessary regulatory burdens and redundancy,” said FMCSA Administrator Raymond P. Martinez.  “It’s a win-win for all parties involved.”

The final rule will eliminate the exemption program that currently requires individuals with ITDM to incur recurring costs to renew and maintain their exemptions.  FMCSA estimates this will save the nearly 5,000 individuals with ITDM that currently have exemptions more than $5 million per year more than what they would endure under the exemption program.  The final rule will also save new ITDM exemption applicants and their associated motor carriers approximately $215,000 annually in opportunity and compliance costs related with the exemption program’s waiting period.