Archive for September, 2016

Financial assistance will help those with driver jobs

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) said earlier this summer that it has awarded $32 million in financial assistance to 15 states to help ensure that foreign truck and bus drivers with driver jobs and vehicles involved in international commerce at or near border crossings with Canada and Mexico are properly licensed to operate on U.S. roads.

The grants are awarded to state law enforcement agencies that share a border with Canada or Mexico and responsible for enforcing the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations at the roadside.

FMCSA awarded BEG funds to the following states:

State

FY16 BEG Award

Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities

   $187,503

Arizona Department of Public Safety

$5,610,269

California Highway Patrol

$5,291,243

Idaho State Police Commercial Vehicle Safety

     $97,923

Maine Department of Public Safety

   $300,000

Michigan Department of State Police

   $200,000

Minnesota State Patrol

   $285,000

Montana Department of Transportation

   $871,410

New Hampshire Department of Safety

     $33,319

New Mexico Department of Public Safety

   $491,215

New York State Department of Transportation

   $643,240

North Dakota Highway Patrol

   $256,375

Texas Department of Public Safety                  $17,205,619
Vermont Agency of Transportation

     $66,058

Washington State Patrol

   $460,826

Campaign takes a look at safety and driver jobs

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016

A new program from the U.S. Department of Transportation is taking a look at safety and driver jobs.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced the launch of its new safety-focused campaign, “Our Roads, Our Responsibility,” to raise public awareness about how to operate safely around large trucks and buses, or commercial motor vehicles (CMVs).

“Trucks and buses move people and goods around the country, contributing to our economic wellbeing and our way of life,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx.  “These commercial vehicles also carry additional safety risks, so it’s critical that all road users understand how to safely share the road.”

Nearly 12 million CMVs are registered to operate in the United States, and in 2014, drivers logged around 300 billion miles on the nation’s roads.  Large trucks and buses have significant size and weight differences, large blind spots, longer stopping distances, and limited maneuverability, which present serious safety challenges for bicyclists, pedestrians, and drivers of passenger vehicles.

“Our Roads, Our Responsibility supports our agency’s core mission of reducing crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving commercial motor vehicles on our roadways,” said FMCSA Administrator Scott Darling.  “Roadway safety is a shared responsibility, and this initiative encourages everyone who uses our roads to be champions for safety.  We look forward to working with all our partners to raise awareness around this issue.”

Are speed limiters needed for driver jobs?

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016

The U.S. Department of Transportation is recommending speed limiters for those with driver jobs.

The Department’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) propose equipping heavy-duty vehicles with devices that limit their speeds on U.S. roadways, and requiring those devices be set to a maximum speed, a safety measure that could save lives and more than $1 billion in fuel costs each year.

The Department’s proposal would establish safety standards requiring all newly manufactured U.S. trucks, buses, and multipurpose passenger vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating more than 26,000 pounds to come equipped with speed limiting devices.

The proposal discusses the benefits of setting the maximum speed at 60, 65, and 68 miles per hour, but the Agencies will consider other speeds based on public input.

“This is basic physics,” said NHTSA Administrator Mark Rosekind. “Even small increases in speed have large effects on the force of impact. Setting the speed limit on heavy vehicles makes sense for safety and the environment.”

“Safe trucking moves our economy and safe bus operations transport our loved ones,” said FMCSA Administrator T.F. Scott Darling III. “This proposal will save lives while ensuring that our nation’s fleet of large commercial vehicles operates fuel efficiently.”

Motor carriers operating commercial vehicles in interstate commerce would be responsible for maintaining the speed limiting devices at or below the designated speed for the service life of the vehicle under the proposal. While the maximum set travel speed will be determined in the final rule, estimates included in the proposal demonstrate that limiting heavy vehicles will save lives.