Archive for June, 2016

Program creates driver jobs

Monday, June 6th, 2016

The Department of Transportation has received a round of grants that will help create driver jobs.

The U.S. Department of Transportation has received 212 applications totaling nearly $9.8 billion for grants through the newly-created Fostering Advancements in Shipping and Transportation for the Long-term Achievement of National Efficiencies (FASTLANE) grant program.

“Transportation creates jobs and makes jobs of the future possible.  We know there is pent up demand for projects that will speed up the delivery of goods and make America even more competitive.  Today, we have even more evidence,” said Secretary Foxx.  “We’re going to do our best to support high impact transportation projects that will lay a new foundation for job creation and exporting American made goods throughout the world.”

Of the 212 applications received, 136 represent projects in urban areas, while the remaining 76 would support rural projects. The deadline for submitting applications was April 14, 2016. The Department of Transportation is currently reviewing all eligible applications.

The FASTLANE program was established in December 2015 as part of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act to fund critical freight and highway projects across the country. FASTLANE grants provide dedicated funding for projects that address major issues facing our nation’s highways and bridges. For the first time in the U.S. Department of Transportation’s 50-year history, the program establishes broad, multiyear eligibilities for freight infrastructure, including intermodal projects.

FASTLANE grants will address many of the challenges outlined in the USDOT report Beyond Traffic, including increased congestion on the nation’s highways and the need for a strong multimodal transportation system to support the expected growth in freight movement both by ton and value.  It is also in line with the Department’s draft National Freight Strategic Plan released in October 2015, which looks at challenges and identifies strategies to address impediments to the efficient flow of goods throughout the nation.

Report on driver jobs and crashes is published

Monday, June 6th, 2016

The annual edition of Large Truck and Bus Crash Facts takes a look at driver jobs and crashes.

  • Of the approximately 411,000 police-reported crashes involving large trucks in 2014, 3,424 (1 percent) resulted in at least one fatality, and 82,000 (20 percent) resulted in at least one nonfatal injury.
  • Single-vehicle crashes (including crashes that involved a bicyclist, pedestrian, nonmotorized vehicle, etc.) made up 21 percent of all fatal crashes, 14 percent of all injury crashes, and 23 percent of all property damage only crashes involving large trucks in 2014. The majority (63 percent) of fatal large truck crashes involved two vehicles.
  • Approximately 61 percent of all fatal crashes involving large trucks occurred on rural roads and 26 percent on rural or urban Interstate highways.
  • Thirty-seven percent of all fatal crashes, 19 percent of all injury crashes, and 20 percent of all property damage only crashes involving large trucks occurred at night (6:00 pm to 6:00 am).
  • The vast majority of fatal crashes (84 percent) and nonfatal crashes (88 percent) involving large trucks occurred on weekdays (Monday through Friday).
  • Collision with a vehicle in transport was the first harmful event (the first event during a crash that resulted in injury or property damage) in 73 percent of fatal crashes involving large trucks, 83 percent of injury crashes involving large trucks, and 75 percent of property damage only crashes involving large trucks.
  • Overturn (rollover) was the first harmful event in 5 percent of all fatal crashes involving large trucks and 2 percent of all nonfatal crashes involving large trucks.
  • In 2014, 30 percent of work zone fatal crashes and 9 percent of work zone injury crashes involved at least one large truck.
  • There were 10.7 fatal large truck crashes per million people in the United States in 2014, a 1-percent increase from 2010.
  • On average, there were 1.14 fatalities in fatal crashes involving large trucks. In the majority of those crashes (90 percent), there was only one fatality.

A new rule that will affect driver jobs

Monday, June 6th, 2016

A brand new rule will affect those who have driver jobs.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) said that passengers riding in large commercial trucks will be required to use seat belts whenever the vehicles are operated on public roads in interstate commerce.

Effective August 8, 2016, the final rule revises Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations and holds motor carriers and drivers responsible for ensuring that passengers riding in large commercial trucks are using seat belts.

In 2014, 37 passengers traveling unrestrained in the cab of a large truck were killed in roadway crashes, according to the most recent data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

Of this number, approximately one-third were ejected from the truck cab.

FMCSA’s most recent Seat Belt Usage by Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) Drivers Survey,  published in March 2014, found that commercial motor vehicle passengers use seat belts at a lower rate (73 percent) than CMV  drivers (84 percent).

Federal rules have long required all commercial drivers to use seat belts.

“Using a seat belt is one of the safest, easiest, and smartest choices drivers and passengers can make before starting out on any road trip,” said FMCSA Acting Administrator Scott Darling. “This rule further protects large truck occupants and will undoubtedly save more lives.”