“Elite” Team named Drivers of the Month

February 7th, 2018

National Carriers, Inc. has named Lisa Peal and Louis Jones as Drivers of the Month for December 2017. The owner operators live in Lubbock, Texas and transport freight on the National Carriers Southwest Regional Fleet. They now are finalists for NCI Driver of the Year, which will be announced during a company award ceremony held at the Bob Duncan Center in Arlington, Texas.

Jones stated, “Neither Lisa or myself come from over-the-road-trucking backgrounds. When we bought our truck, I asked a friend for advice. He told me he had driven for National Carriers in the past and if he were still driving, this is where he would be. I decided to give it a try and that was three years ago. Lisa joined me as a co-driver this past summer.”

“Louis and Lisa are very quiet people and easy to get along with. NCI can always count on them in times of need and to do their job every day. We appreciate them for what they do for our company and enjoy working with them,” shared Operations Manager, Shaun Berry.

Peal said, “I joined Louis on the truck this year. I know it gets lonely when he is by himself for weeks at a time on the road. Together, we have a plan for our future and we are working hard to accomplish our goals through National Carriers.”

Each Driver of the Month is a finalist for NCI Driver of the Year 2017 with each monthly winner receiving a $500 bonus. National Carriers Driver of the Year is announced at the NCI Driver of the Year Banquet on April 20th.

  Company Information

National Carriers is a diversified motor carrier servicing all 48 states in the continental United States with transportation offerings which include refrigerated, livestock, and logistics services. At National Carriers, our mission is “to be the safest, most customer-focused, and successful motor carrier in our class.”  

     Being part of the Elite Fleet® means enjoying a career worthy of your skills and commitment to excellence. We believe long-term success is waiting for you at National Carriers®, one of the nation’s oldest, most respected and largest carriers. Learn about our exciting opportunities for owner operators as well as company drivers.  If you are interested in a leasing a truck, National Carriers® Leasing Division is the ideal partner to help you get started.

Automated vehicles and driver jobs

February 6th, 2018

The U.S. Department of Transportation is making a statement on automated vehicles, their progress, and the impact on driver jobs.

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao discussed the Department’s progress in advancing the release of Federal Automated Vehicle Policy (FAVP) 3.0, also known as A Vision for Safety 3.0,  during her remarks at CES in Las Vegas, Nevada.

“Autonomous vehicle technologies will have a tremendous impact on society in terms of safety, mobility, and security,” Secretary Chao said.

FAVP 3.0 will emphasize a unified, intermodal approach to automated driving systems (ADSs) policy. It will enable the safe integration of surface automated transportation systems, including cars, trucks, light rail, infrastructure, and port operations.

“Policy makers need to preserve the creativity and innovation that is part of the American tradition and allow innovation to flourish,” Secretary Chao added.

As part of its efforts, the Department today published several automated vehicle notices for public comment on the DOT Website and submitted them to the Federal Register. The Department is seeking public input from across the transportation industry to identify barriers to innovation and shape initiatives.

The published notices include:

·       Federal Highway Administration (FHWA):

o      Request for Information (RFI) on Integration of ADS into the Highway Transportation System: To better understand what is needed to accommodate ADS technologies, and maximize their potential benefits, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) seeks the public’s input through a formal RFI to supplement strategy development. Advancing the next generation of America’s transportation network can only happen with input from an array of informed sources, including stakeholders, industry experts and the public at large.

 

Grant to help those with driver jobs

February 6th, 2018

A grant for those affected by recent hurricanes may affect driver jobs.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) announced the immediate availability of $6.5 million in “quick release” Emergency Relief (ER) funds for further repairs to roads and bridges throughout the U.S. Virgin Islands.

“The work continues to rebuild broken transportation links in the U.S. Virgin Islands in the aftermath of Hurricanes Irma and Maria,” said Acting Federal Highway Administrator Brandye L. Hendrickson. “These additional funds will help ensure residents can travel safely.”

The additional funding supplements $8 million in ER funds previously made available to the U.S. Virgin Islands for Hurricanes Maria and Irma damage, bringing the total amount to $14.5 million for emergency work.  The bulk of the funds provided today will be used to restore traffic signal service on the islands of St. Thomas and St. Croix and make repairs to damaged intersections critical to highway safety.

The FHWA’s ER program provides funding for highways and bridges damaged by natural disasters or catastrophic events.

The “quick release” payments to U.S. Virgin Islands are considered as initial installments of funds used to restore essential traffic and limit further highway damage, which can help long-term repair work begin more quickly.

Driver shortage may intensify

January 6th, 2018

A new report from the American Trucking Association highlights the impact of the shortage of drivers for truck driver jobs.

American Trucking Associations Chief Economist Bob Costello released the findings of his latest report into the driver shortage, warning the trucking industry could be short 50,000 drivers by the end of 2017.

“In addition to the sheer lack of drivers, fleets are also suffering from a lack of qualified drivers, which amplifies the effects of the shortage on carriers,” Costello said. “This means that even as the shortage numbers fluctuate, it remains a serious concern for our industry, for the supply chain and for the economy at large.”

According to the report, ATA’s first in-depth examination of the driver shortage since 2015, the driver shortage eased in 2016 to roughly 36,500 – down from 2015’s shortfall of 45,000.

“We experienced a ‘freight recession,’ last year, which eased the pressure on the driver market,” Costello said. “Now that freight volumes accelerating again, we should expect to see a significant tightening of the driver market.”

In the report, ATA projects the shortage to reach 50,000 by the end of 2017 and if current trends hold the shortage could grow to more than 174,000 by 2026.

Costello detailed the causes of the shortage in the report, including the demographics of the aging driver population, lifestyle issues, regulatory challenges and others; as well as possible solutions.

“While the shortage is a persistent issue in our industry, motor carriers are constantly working to address it,” he said. “We already see fleets raising pay and offering other incentives to attract drivers. Fleets are also doing more to improve the lifestyle and image of the truck driver, but there are also policy changes like reducing the driver age as part of a graduated licensing system, or easing the transition for returning veterans, that can make getting into this industry easier and therefore help with the shortage.”

Driver jobs among best for those without college degree

January 5th, 2018

Careerbuilder has released a list of jobs that are excellent opportunities for those without a college degree, and the top honors goes to driver jobs.

CareerBuilder’s list of the in-demand jobs for 2018 that do not require a college degree are comprised of occupations where the number of job postings each month outpace the number of people they actually hire. The list includes other data points, such as job growth and salary.

Among occupations that do not typically require a college education and have the largest gap between job openings and hires are the following:

Occupation

Average Monthly Unique Job Postings

Average Monthly Hires

Gap Between Postings and Hires

Job Growth 2012-2017

Total Employment in 2017

Median Hourly Earnings

Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers

1,662,847

107,845

1,555,003

174,188

1,966,281

$19.26

First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers

276,477

85,445

192,033

60,541

1,428,776

$17.10

Food Service Managers

60,718

20,007

40,710

22,240

285,765

$19.82

Insurance Sales Agents

57,103

17,183

39,920

51,659

585,302

$23.17

Computer User Support Specialists

58,569

34,283

24,287

85,704

700,574

$23.81

Social and Human Service Assistants

38,869

19,967

18,902

51,885

400,143

$15.33

Real Estate Sales Agents

18,169

9,238

8,931

11,828

390,490

$17.92

Pharmacy Technicians

26,808

20,726

6,082

36,929

409,870

$14.87

Medical Assistants

28,641

26,239

2,402

72,974

664,087

$15.18

Tax Preparers

6,695

6,108

588

3,532

98,983

$19.60

 

Art contest and driver jobs

January 3rd, 2018

A recent contest held this year highlights safety and driver jobs.

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Deputy Administrator Cathy F. Gautreaux announced the 2017 Road Safety Student Art Contest winners. Top honors go to 2nd grader Avni Choudepally of Morrisville, North Carolina, and 4th grader Lynn Sun of Livingston, New Jersey.

The winners announced exhibited exemplary creativity in communicating why all who share the road should make safety their top priority.

The contest was open to all students in kindergarten through sixth grade. Previously known as the Be Ready, Be Buckled Safety Belt Art Contest, this year’s contest expanded from emphasizing the importance of seat belt use to educating passenger vehicle drivers, bicyclists, and pedestrians about sharing the road with commercial motor vehicles and working together to reduce crashes.

“All of the students who participated in this year’s contest are frequent passengers in vehicles or pedestrians themselves, so now is the perfect time to engage them in the importance of road safety,” said Deputy Administrator Gautreaux. “The winners impressed and inspired me with their originality and creativity.”

The contest is organized by the Our Roads, Our Safety Partnership and the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Belt Partnership, which includes FMCSA and more than 30 other government, safety, industry, and private organizations. These partnerships are essential to amplifying safety messages about buckling up and understanding the challenges and special considerations when traveling near or around buses and large trucks.

The two winning entries will hang in FMCSA’s headquarters and FMCSA will coordinate with each school’s administration to honor the winners. The entries from the following 12 students.

Trucking statistics highlight impact of driver jobs

December 6th, 2017

The latest trucking statistics are out, and they are demonstrating the impact of driver jobs.

U.S.-NAFTA freight totaled $94.4 billion as three out of five major transportation modes carried more freight by value with North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) partners Canada and Mexico in September 2017 compared to September 2016, according to the TransBorder Freight Data released by the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

Trucks carried 64.3 percent of U.S.-NAFTA freight and continued to be the most utilized mode for moving goods to and from both U.S.-NAFTA partners. Trucks accounted for $31.0 billion of the $50.2 billion of imports (61.8 percent) and $29.7 billion of the $44.2 billion of exports (67.2 percent).

Comparing September 2016 to September 2017, the value of U.S.-Canada freight flows increased by 5.0 percent to $48.5 billion as the value of freight on four major modes increased from a year earlier.

The value of freight carried on vessel increased by 52.4 percent due in part to an increase in the unit value and a 23.9 percent increase in the volume of mineral fuels traded. Pipeline increased by 11.1 percent, truck by 3.1 percent, and rail by 2.4 percent. Air decreased by 5.0 percent due to a notable decrease of 13.5 percent in the value of pearls and stones transported.

Trucks carried 58.6 percent of the value of the freight to and from Canada. Rail carried 16.0 percent followed by pipeline, 9.5 percent; air, 4.6 percent; and vessel, 4.3 percent. The surface transportation modes of truck, rail and pipeline carried 84.1 percent of the value of total U.S.-Canada freight flows.

 

 

Grants to enhance safety for driver jobs

December 6th, 2017

A number of grants are going towards driver jobs to enhance safety.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) said it has

awarded more than $70 million in grants to states and educational institutions to enhance commercial motor vehicle (CMV) safety.

“Our shared goal of a safer transportation system is a top priority,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.  “These grants will further assist state and local officials in their efforts to prevent commercial motor vehicle crashes and injuries each year, and have the potential to save hundreds of lives.”

FMCSA gave:

  • $41.5 million in High Priority (HP) grants to enhance states’ commercial motor vehicle safety efforts, as well as advance technological capability within states,
  • $30.7 million in Commercial Driver’s License Program Implementation (CDLPI) grants to enhance efforts by states to improve the national commercial driver’s license (CDL) program, and
  • $1 million in Commercial Motor Vehicle Operator Safety Training grants to nine education institutions to help train veterans for jobs as commercial bus and truck drivers.

“In addition, the Department is proud to recognize the sacrifices of our nation’s heroes by providing more veterans with the opportunity to contribute to the safety of our roadways through training grants for the next generation of commercial drivers,” Secretary Chao added.

FMCSA’s Commercial Driver’s License Program Implementation (CDLPI) grant program provides financial assistance to states to achieve compliance with FMCSA regulations concerning driver’s license standards and programs.  Additionally, the CDLPI grant program provides financial assistance to other entities capable of executing national projects that aid states in their compliance efforts, which will improve the national CDL program.

Safety belt usage affecting driver jobs

December 6th, 2017

New data out on safety belt usage is showing trends in driver jobs.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) stated that safety belt usage by commercial truck and bus drivers rose to a new record level of 86 percent in 2016, compared to just 65 percent usage in 2007, according to the results of a national survey.

“Buckling up your safety belt, regardless of the type of vehicle you drive or ride in, remains the simplest, easiest and most effective step you can take toward helping to protect your life,” said FMCSA Deputy Administrator Cathy F. Gautreaux.  “While it is good news that we are making strong progress, we need to continue to emphasize that everyone, everywhere securely fasten their safety belt 100 percent of the time.”

Since 2007, FMCSA, in collaboration with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has conducted the Safety Belt Usage by Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers Survey six times.  In each survey, safety belt usage by commercial drivers has been shown to be steadily increasing.

The 2016 survey observed nearly 40,000 commercial drivers operating medium- to heavy-duty trucks and buses at more than 1,000 roadside sites nationwide.  The survey found that safety belt usage for commercial drivers and their occupants was highest by trucks and buses traveling on expressways at 89 percent, compared to 83 percent on surface streets.  Male truck and bus drivers outpaced their female counterparts by buckling-up at a rate of 86 percent to 84 percent, respectively.

States with “secondary” seat belt laws (law enforcement officers may only stop drivers for violations other than not being buckled) have nearly matched states with “primary” seat belt laws (officers can stop and ticket drivers and occupants for simply not wearing a safety belt) – 84 percent compared to 85 percent – in the most recent survey.

Regionally, the survey found that commercial vehicle drivers and their occupants in the West, the Midwest and the South all wore safety belts at an 87 percent rate.  Only in the Northeast region was safety belt usage by truck and bus drivers different and significantly lower at just 71 percent.

Grants go to help driver jobs

November 6th, 2017

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced that it has awarded more than $70 million in grants to states and educational institutions to enhance commercial motor vehicle (CMV) safety and boost driver jobs.

“Our shared goal of a safer transportation system is a top priority,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.  “These grants will further assist state and local officials in their efforts to prevent commercial motor vehicle crashes and injuries each year, and have the potential to save hundreds of lives.”

FMCSA announced:

  • $41.5 million in High Priority (HP) grants to enhance states’ commercial motor vehicle safety efforts, as well as advance technological capability within states,
  • $30.7 million in Commercial Driver’s License Program Implementation (CDLPI) grants to enhance efforts by states to improve the national commercial driver’s license (CDL) program, and
  • $1 million in Commercial Motor Vehicle Operator Safety Training grants to nine education institutions to help train veterans for jobs as commercial bus and truck drivers.

“In addition, the Department is proud to recognize the sacrifices of our nation’s heroes by providing more veterans with the opportunity to contribute to the safety of our roadways through training grants for the next generation of commercial drivers,” Secretary Chao added.

FMCSA’s High Priority (HP) grant program consists of HP-Commercial Motor Vehicle (HP-CMV) grants and HP-Innovative Technology Deployment (HP-ITD) grants.  HP-CMV grants are designed to provide financial assistance to state commercial vehicle safety efforts, while HP-ITD grants provide financial assistance to advance the technological capability and promote the deployment of intelligent transportation system applications for CMV operations.

“Safe drivers lead to safer roadways, and safer roadways ensure that our loved ones return home at the end of their journey,” said FMCSA Deputy Administrator Daphne Jefferson.  “These grants will help ensure that our state partners have the tools and resources they need to support FMCSA’s mission of reducing crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses.”